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Rosie Salayeva

My collection was inspired by the multidimensionality of women. I primarily take inspiration from film and music, and this collection specifically was inspired by the film Black Swan (2010) and the album Melodrama by Lorde. I believe the film and album are great examples that demonstrate Freud's psychoanalytic theory, which primarily defines the id, superego, and ego. These two works demonstrate a woman's ability to be both fragile and reckless. That is something I wanted to highlight in my final garments, using soft color palettes and fabrics, but incorporating pops of red in varying forms.

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Designer Interview

Describe your point of view as a designer:

As a designer with a psychology degree, I’m aware of how important clothing is to making a first impression and showing what an individual’s personality is like. When designing womenswear, I can relate to the feeling that most women may have; feeling very fragile and vulnerable, but wanting to feel bold and confident instead. I have personally used clothing as a way to complement my femininity, while also expressing recklessness as a way of not appearing so weak. I want designs that achieve just that; designs that show a woman's femininity but don't sacrifice empowerment.
What is your design aesthetic?

I don't have a single aesthetic, but I am more interested in merging different aesthetics together. I mainly go for looks that are soft but with a hint of rawness. Something that makes the wearer embrace the complexity of their personalities.

Who are your design influences?

My design influences range from Noir Kei Ninomiya to Miu Miu, and from Alexander McQueen to Shushu/Tong. All designers mentioned above have unique aesthetics that are feminine and edgy. They don't sacrifice one for the other. All four contribute to subverting femininity and delicacy in their own ways.

What makes your work unique?

I appreciate fashion and art in all its forms and aesthetics, and that's what I want to explore as I further my career.  I don't think I will stick to a single style or a single form of garment-making. I frequently discover new aesthetics and new ways to make art, and I hope to be able to branch out and try them out, incorporating them into my work. As I progress further into the fashion industry, I think that is something that will differentiate my work.